chuvaness
On the road: More scary in the Philippines
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We hear about crime all the time, but the impact is always stronger when it happens to someone we know.
With elections coming up on May 13th next year, it’s time to think about who we’re voting for.
We need to vote for people who really care about making changes for good, and making this country a safer place for all of us.

MALATE—October 10, 2012

Carlos Celdran was attacked in his own neighborhood, Malate, and posted this on his Facebook page:
“After having noodles at Qan Do Lami last night—due to rain and poor visibility—I backed up my car and accidentally tipped over a motorbike.
When I came out to check if everything was OK, I was accosted by the very, very drunk owner of the bike, who had just left one of the girly bars next door.
After a few kicks to my torso, and punches to my head, bystanders managed to hold him back.
But as I tried to drive away, the man and his companion broke away from the bystanders’ grasp, pulled out my side mirror and punched in my back window with a rod.
Thank God he did not have a gun. I do have a bump in the back of my ear as a souvenir of the evening.”

Carlos Celdran's car

Later, Carlos returned to the girly bar on Sinagoga and Mabini.
The staff said the attacker is a “marketer” or a pimp that takes commission from bars for bringing Koreans and Japanese tourists to meet Guest Relations Officers.
“His name is Rey and the people in the bars don’t like him either. I’ll let this go. This guy is scum and I wouldn’t put it past him to have me shot on the street for a few bucks,” Carlos wrote.

Quezon Avenue—October 23, 2012

Yesterday morning, my husband was on board a van with a driver and three office staff, when they saw a white Toyota Vios with plate number PQT 567 coming from the right side lane, with blinking lights.
At first they thought it wanted to change lanes, but it moved slowly, closer to the van.
A man rolled down the window of the front passenger seat and shouted to the driver: “Tabi mo! Tabi mo!”

In Manila you’re not supposed to stop for anything while on the road—due to carnappers, kidnappers, hold-uppers, or hostage-taking. My husband told the driver not to stop.
The sped up a little but the car kept cutting in front of them and signaling them to move to the right inner lane.

“You’re thinking lots of things at this moment and wondering what this is about. Since there were two men wearing shirts marked Land Transportation Franchising & Regulatory Board and we were five people in the van, we decided to stop,” my husband said.
“One of the men came out of the car and approached our driver’s window. He looked inside and mumbled something and left. According to my staff he was checking if our private van was being used as an unregistered PUV (public utility vehicle) that transports people for a fee.”

My husband took a photo and tweeted it to @LTFRB_Official and @MMDA

Jeroen's

@LTFRB_Official replied:

tweet
tweet

It appears whoever is tweeting for @LTFRB_Official is lost in translation.
We shall send this entry to Asec. Torres.
@MMDA never replied by the way.
What the hell is going on? Does anybody have a clue? Does anybody care??

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Guest

Beware because Christmas is almost here and there are so many new rackets that these scums have cook up, that you can not differentiate whether they’re legitimate or not, or whether they were even allowed to do this at all.  I didn’t realize that there is anti-colorum whatever that these guys are so hot on, but the way they stop the private cars while not revealing their identity is truly disturbing and wrong. They are only adding to the anxiety of the poor motorists, what with so many crimes going on in the streets.  

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Guest

@MMDA NEVER replies to negative tweets, even to my tweets about wrong doings on the roads. But they do retweet lots and LOTS of praises.

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Ikaela

What Rachel said. I have lived and traveled in numerous places in the Philippines, including big cities, small provinces and remote islands that require 2-3 days travel. Being a woman often traveling alone, locals can’t help but warn me of dangers after showing me the beauty of their place. If not someone trying to scam you, extort money from you, charge you “foreigner prices” or steal whatever little stuff you have on you, it’s someone who might rape you or try to get a free peep show while you bathe. As a Filipina, I find this stupid, annoying and saddening… Read more »

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Guest

Our MM streets have actually become scary. 🙁 I wish the police could / would restore order soon! 

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Guest

I grew up in Antipolo, where a man was killed after leaving the gym, only because the thieves wanted his cellphone. Antipolo is not strictly classified as NCR, and it’s a town in many ways, but like many Philippine towns, it’s not safe to walk there at night. My point is, we have to be honest and admit that it’s not safe to live in the Philippines.

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Raincloudsky

The truth will always come out, and people who hide behind the fiction and the propaganda that everything is a.o.k wether in Manila or the Philippines will also be revealed.. I commend bloggers who have a greater reach in media nowadays more than ever because I think they represent the truths not present anymore in traditional media (newspapers, tv, ‘polls’ etc) which are owned and controlled by politically motivated forces. It is truly SCARY that one of the topics in every ‘small talk’ or chitchat i’ve made during any small family or friends gathering, social function, business function etc… always… Read more »

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Albert Rendal

Am glad you and your companions are ok, thank GOD for that.
Lets all be vigilant and still be have a positive attitude of life. Yes do report them, tweet, post on Facebook and blogs so that people will be aware and bad people will be warned…
GODBLESS…

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Guest

“One of the men came out of the car and approached our driver’s window. He looked inside and mumbled something and left.” That’s it? No apology? Not even an explanation for stopping the car and scaring the shit out of the passengers? Now that’s sick. [Reply]Deepa Reply:October 27th, 2012 at 5:28 PMTrue! He should have at least identified himself as part of this LTFRB anti-colorum effort. Sana i-train yung mga task force to do that at the very least.  Mas ok ng slight (slight lang) ang dating kung merong pasakalye man lang na “LTFRB kami!” mo ka utusan na itabi… Read more »

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Guest

True! He should have at least identified himself as part of this LTFRB anti-colorum effort. Sana i-train yung mga task force to do that at the very least. 

Mas ok ng slight (slight lang) ang dating kung merong pasakalye man lang na “LTFRB kami!” mo ka utusan na itabi ang sasakyan. Parang local equivalent ng “Police! Freeze!” I think it would be better for our collective peace of mind at least!

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Guest

The scariest thing that happened to me when I still lived in Manila started because I gave one of our neighbors who worked as a Traffic Enforcer a lift. We were both going to the Makati City Hall that day. As we crossed the red light from JP Rizal going towards the Power Plant Mall, 3 vans stopped/surrounded us and 4-5 gun toting men  came rushing out. They made my neighbor get out of my car and accused him of taking a bribe from me (the reason why he was riding in my car). I had to get out of the… Read more »

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joey__19

kayo naman… we’re okay here. wala sa atin ang mga demonyo, nasa labas ng bansa nandoon ang mga bigtime demonyo. 

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potato

Kung undercover man sila, alam naman nila siguro ang mga terminal ng mga colorum diba, wag sa gitna ng daan, tamang hinala kasi eh.

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Guest

KUNG GUSTO NYO TUMINO ANG GOBYERNO NATIN… PLEASE HWAG NYO NANG IBOTO ANG IEENDORSO NG IGLESIA NI CRISTO. ISA ITONG MALAKING MAFIA SA PILIPINAS. PANIGURADO TITINO ANG GOBYERNO DAHIL WALA NA SILANG PADRINO AT PALAKASAN KASI WALANG UTANG NA LOOB ANG MGA PULITIKO SA KANILA.

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Guest

LTFRB, MMDA, LTO, it is not a case or question of who’s jurisdiction it is. Since the car is (like you said) not a PUV and obviously a private vehicle, and the people occupying it are wearing “Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board”, isn’t it obvious that they are using the department’s/board’s name?  Why can’t you check who that car belongs to? Then have the authorities question them. The car is registered. There should be a name behind that registration. Whoever they are, they are part of this scam/racket or whatever you might want to call it. These people are the reason… Read more »

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Guest

???

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omnesia

Di nila na gets na nagsusumbong ka na there was misrepresentation of government agencies. Akala ng LTFRB you are reporting misuse of PUV–LTFRB’s response means, the car you photographed is not a PUV and is therefore not under their jurisdiction to control. They are referring the matter to MMDA, but their jurisdiction is traffic related so, they are not acting on your case because they know it is not traffic but crime-related. Next steps: 1) you can try to clarify the matter (spell it out, idiot-proof) to LTFRB again na ang isinusumbong nyo eh yung agents who represented themselves as… Read more »

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Mandy

One thing I noticed is that they are deliberately trying not to understand the complaint/photo and just want to point fingers at someone else. 🙁 Kailangan ba na idaan pa ito sa taong mas mataas ang posisyon para bigyan pansin ang kalokohan ng LTFRB na ito? It’s too bad, that your husband was not able to get the name of the person who was supposed to be an LTFRB “agent”. Walang ID or warrant? Tsk tsk. Besides, like one commenter suggested that there are other ways to find out if a van is colorum. Sakay sila sa van and tingnan… Read more »

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eugenefling

But really, Ms. Author, do you really have to use THAT parody on the slogan to get your message across? I welcome warnings like this but making use of the tourism slogan in a bad way is definitely not acceptable. You are scaring readers from across the seas with it. All countries, including the US, Britain, etc. have their own accounts of things like these, so it is definitely not a monopoly of the Philippines. If you think this title is catchy to attract attention, you did the right decision. But remember, this will go a long way as far… Read more »

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omnesia

Hahaha grabe talaga haters mo Cecile, bilib ako magpaikot ng issue biglang naging problema mo!! scary! 🙂 Mr/Ms eugenefling, sana lang hindi mangyari itong hulidap sa yo at sa pamilya mo. 🙂 Try not to focus on the personality or the messenger… the issue being talked about is life or death. If you were in the seat of a car being held at gun point, I’m sure being witty or clever would be the last of your problems. I pray you don’t realize this the hard way. BTW, before you jump at the chance to troll again on my reply,… Read more »

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Supernova

 I agree. Buti sana if they raised valid points against what was written, but it’s just plain nitpicking. Hindi ko na lang alam kung matatawa ako or maiinis.

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Jeroen

Instead of shouting at the messenger you should redirect your energy to the people and institutions who could change all this. When i hear of a bad experience in our establishment i will do my very best to solve the situation so that it won`t happen to the same customer and prevent others from experiencing unpleasant service. When i do not take action i will lose my customers one by one and in the end i will no longer make money, i will need to close my business.  It should not be any different now that when people complain about… Read more »

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mintmocha

So… if Cecile had been more “responsible” and used a different title instead, the actual content of her post wouldn’t make possible tourists think twice about visiting our country? Yep. That makes sense.

I for one am glad that Cecile blogs about these kinds of things. Sadly, it takes someone of influence to complain before any attempt at positive change is made. I hope our government sits up and takes notice because I am beyond sick and tired of having to put up with all kinds of corruption day in and day out.

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Nath

I am from overseas and I live in the city in Canada with the HIGHEST crime rate in the whole country. Saying that these kinds of things happen everywhere else in the world does not negate the fact that they should still be reported and written about. As for the slogan being used in a negative way, you got so lost in that little twist on the words that you missed the message. As someone who used to live there, I know how scary it can get. It IS scary there. And if you don’t acknowledge that fact, it’s like… Read more »

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Theairis

congratulations! mukhang hindi mo pa nae-experience ang ma-harass at matakot ng mga kagaya nila kaya mo nasasabi yan! balitaan mo ko pag na-experience mo na tapos sabihin mo sakin kung d ka natakot!!

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Guest

This is why I don’t want to learn driving. Takot ako sa mga bus, sa mga mayayabang sa kalye, sa carnapper at holdaper at pati sa MMDA at pulis minsan! :/

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Guest

Sigh. So scary indeed. Vote wisely everyone!

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Funkeyguhl

okay fine the men who stopped your husband’s car is not from LTFRB but shouldn’t they investigate as to why these men did this? They have public records meaning registration of the car and all so they should be able to trace this right?  I hope this reach the news agencies… I hope they pick this story up… we will never know if the next one who will be stopped by this so-called officials might be held up against their will or whatever…  This is not very good news for OFWs who is thinking of going back to the Philippines.… Read more »

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KUMAGCOW

I’m sure this has happened to a lot of people. What if you didn’t stop? What if you tried to get away from them because you thought they were carnappers? Will they just shoot at you and your vehicle? Hopefully no. No matter how noble they think what they are doing, private vehicles should never flag down other private vehicles. There ought to be clear rules that only police can do this. If they are not policemen, what are their jurisdiction and it should never be like this. The horrors of Manila continues, a tough cookie to swallow. 

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Guest

So scary. 🙁 This is the problem with Manila, the people who are supposed to be on the look out for the general well being of the populace are sometimes the ones to look out and be wary of. 🙁

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