chuvaness
Crying over a hamburger
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So yesterday I was at Pepper Lunch Shangri-La, having merienda with our maid and driver, when I saw on Twitter that Carlos Celdran was found guilty of “offending religious feelings.”

I read online that Carlos can go to jail between “2 months and 21 days to a maximum of one year, 1 month and 11 days.”
I have no idea why the numbers are like that.
All I know is I started to cry while eating this double hamburger (shameless plug).

Because I'm spoiled

“The last time I cried over a hamburger was at Brother’s Burger, when I heard that Gilda (Cordero-Fernando) had a heart attack,” I told my friend Jude over the phone.
“So stop eating hamburger,” Jude curtly said.
Jude had visited Carlos in jail when he was arrested last September 30, 2010.


Carlos Celdran

I believe the night he spent in jail was enough. Carlos apologized. He has been banned from bringing his tours around the churches. Don’t know if he was excommunicated and I don’t want to bug him to ask.


Carlos facebook

Yesterday I spent a great deal of time ranting on Twitter and even arguing with some righteous Catholics with four followers. I consider myself deeply Catholic even though I don’t go to Mass regularly. I like to think that Jesus, while on earth, would have drawn people to himself, instead of repel. So why do some righteous Catholics tend to alienate others instead of inspire?
By nighttime I had a feeling of remorse and used an app to erase more than 2,000 tweets on my timeline, and with that, I went to bed.
So now that even the President thinks Carlos should be pardoned, I think we can rest assured, Carlos will be free.

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Guest

Is he free now?

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lolaproblems

Don’t do the crime, if you can’t do the time. The law is the law, is the law, no matter how archaic. One can’t choose what law to follow if it doesn’t suit their preference. 

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Guest

While I completely acknowledge the outrage that a lot of people have with regard to the decision against Carlos Celdran, I urge everyone to be a little more objective and circumspect when reviewing the decision of the Metropolitan Trial Court.   Article 133 of the Revised Penal Code does provide that the crime of “Offending Religious Feelings” is committed by “anyone who, in a place devoted to religious worship or during the celebration of any religious ceremony, shall perform acts notoriously offensive to the feelings of the faithful.” In the Celdran case, the judge only had to look at whether… Read more »

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Guest

*nosebleed* Tissue nga, yaya!

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Guest

“Third, was the subject act notoriously offensive to the feelings of the faithful?  I believe that this was the critical issue in this legal proceeding.”
– I am a Catholic. I may not be as zealous as other Catholics, but I consider myself among the faithful. Did the Court consider only the feelings of the faithful who were present during the act? If not, I don’t see the act as “notoriously offensive”.

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Guest

Hi teadrinker.  Unfortunately, in the case at hand, the Trial Court only had to consider the “religious feelings” of the people who were present inside the Manila Cathedral when the incident occurred.  Again, the dire warning of Justice Laurel as stated in his Dissenting Opinion in the Baes case should make us all pause and think:  “(If) the gravity or leniency of the offense would hinge on the subjective characterization of the act from the point of view of a given religious denomination or sect, in such a case, the application of the law would be partial and arbitrary, withal,… Read more »

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Guest

I agree with Justice Laurel.

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neutralistic

If God can forgive, so can…

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Guest

I
like that Celdran puts the spotlight on these issues, but it doesn’t
change the fact that he’s an arrogant prick. In this case, he went
against a bigger prick and lost.

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CVS Reply:

you also sound like one

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hew me Reply:

dead

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Walter Robles Reply:

Well we all do at some point, especially taking into consideration who’s hearing the things we say. Most of us, however, don’t end up in prison for sounding like a prick.

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Guest

Going to church doesn’t make you a Christian anymore than going to McDonald’s makes you a hamburger. (Keith Green)

This reminder applies to priests, religious leaders and us, ordinary mortals, alike…

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Guest

i’m sure he will have a lot of support from the public (me included).

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hiddendragon

Tx for reminding us that it was a  meeting, not the Mass that CC interrupted.  Would it help resolve the issue if he got convicted (because the law is the law) and then the courts immediately forgive him, like GMA did to Erap, then our lawmakers start working on changing the law? Sometimes I like Carlos Celdran, sometimes I don’t like him. But let us be rational and humane about the whole thing – to him, to the Church and to all the Filipino women who suffer the most from our indifference and neglect to their ignorance and helplessness. Let’s… Read more »

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Guest

Let us not forget that this situation is not unique to the Philippines and certainly not unique to Catholicism.

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Guest

May pag-asa pa. The court that handed down the decision was the Manila Metropolitan Trial Court. May Court of Appeals pa and Supreme Court. I hope he gets pro bono legal help. It could be quite costly. Not to mention tedious and time-consuming. Irritating, too, if not resolved for a long period of time.

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Guest

I think it would go down in history better if Carlos Celdran accepts the consequences of his action and serve jail time. After all, if he really believes that what he did was worth it and invaluable to the opening up of the debate on RH Bill, then, he will see going to jail as nothing. 

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acidspew

funny how most of the hateful, bigoted and incendiary vitriol I see in comments about the rh issue and this are from people who happen to claim that god is on their side.

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Guest

Carlos Celdran’s crime was NOT for expressing his opinion, as some righteous people claim. His crime was for disrupting an on-going church service.  It was the management of the Manila Cathedral that sued him, NOT the CBCP nor the Catholic Church in general. “FREEDOM” is relative. Your freedom ends when you violate someone else’s freedom. Mr. Celdran is free to express his opinion but he is not free to intrude into a church service attended by people who wants to pray. [Reply]acidspew Reply:January 30th, 2013 at 8:57 AM wow.  I didn’t know that the people that ran the manila cathedral are… Read more »

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acidspew

 wow.  I didn’t know that the people that ran the manila cathedral are not members of the cbcp nor the catholic church.  thanks for clearing that up.

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Guest

please don’t be *******. you know fully well what i mean. The Manila Cathedral administrators, while members of the Catholic Church, do not speak for the Church as a whole, nor of the CBCP as a collective body of bishops. And they do not have to seek approval for matters that concern the running of the church.

Please refer to this article on the Inquirer: Bishops have long forgiven Celdran, says CBCP exec
http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/349223/bishops-have-long-forgiven-celdran-says-cbcp-exec

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acidspew

 wow, were you cussing?  no surprises there…

and just to be clear: so are you implying that the cbcp is not condoning what those rebellious ragtag group of mayhem seekers working in manila cathedral did? 

because from what I learned in catholic school, washing one’s hands does not mean you’re not involved. 

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Guest

https://www.facebook.com/#!/photo.php?fbid=10152664403600413&set=a.10150314632795413.564509.89494795412&type=1&theater

I saw this photo on facebook and it reminded me of staid religion has become in the Philippines.  Maybe people would be less critical of the Catholic church if they accepted criticism instead of acting aggressively towards it. 

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gusm

The blending of religion, laws and politics in this country
is ridiculous. The Catholic Church always interject (openly and aggressively)
in the shaping of our laws in this country (even though there is supposed to be
separation between religion and the state), yet there is no punishment for that. Our laws and our government are
confused and schizophrenic.

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Guest

Not only there are “righteous Catholics” but there are so many of them thriving in each religion, and that’s what people call “religious hypocrites.” Righteousness is not about religion or Catholicism. Whatever religion or faith one believes in, the essence of the truth of that faith or religion is by the way one leads and conducts his life and the trust he puts on his Supreme God. Even if one religiously follow all the doctrines and rules of a religion, say for example, attending a Catholic mass every day or every Sunday, doesn’t make him righteous. We can only be… Read more »

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Guest

dead at “offending religious feelings”
that’s so ridiculous

that law is stupid as f*ck

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Guest

Ms. C, I understand where you’re coming from ’cause he’s your friend. Based on what I know about the case, I do believe he has to serve time because he did violate a law. Those who say that the verdict is against free speech got it wrong. I think this article explained it well http://getrealphilippines.com/blog/2013/01/why-carlos-celdran-should-go-to-jail-for-his-2010-damaso-stunt/ Also, pwede na lang ba ang sorry when someone commits a mistake? I don’t think so. Imagine if the Damaso act was done in a mosque, I am sure almost everyone will cry foul and will say that it was against peaceful worship. [Reply]CVS Reply:January… Read more »

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Lia

I have to agree with you. I understand Carlos Celdran, I understand what he was trying to do, I am also pro-RH. I just think there is a proper forum for a protest. I am a Catholic, and even though I tune out when the priest starts spewing off anti-RH spiels during homily, I will not appreciate it if someone blatantly disrupts Mass.

I do think that the jail term is over the top, and would alienate more Catholics from the Church. Community service perhaps?

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Guest

Natawa ako dun sa “some righteous Catholics with four followers.” Sinong followers niya? yung 4 members ng CBCP? Lols!

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