chuvaness
The best sushi in the world
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“You have to love your job. You must fall in love with your work.”

Before Jeroen and I got married, we spent our spare time watching rented laser discs and VHS tapes at home (yes, this was the late ’90s).
To this day I look forward to our movie dates at home, though renting movies outside is no longer necessary.
I enjoy watching movies on my Mac, with the lights out, the freezing aircon, and hiding under a blanket.
Yesterday my dad gave us a copy of Jiro Dreams of Sushi, about an 85 year-old sushi chef, Jiro Ono, considered by many as the world’s greatest sushi chef.

Jiro Dreams of Sushi SG poster

Ten minutes into the film, Jeroen and I felt very much moved by documentary, which also made me seriously crave for sushi. Watching it reminded me of eating sushi in Ginza, where tears rolled down my cheeks when the chef put too much wasabi on my food.
Such a thing would never happen in Sukiyabashi Jiro, where sushi is prepared to perfection.

Sukiyabashi Jiro

The 10-seat, sushi-only restaurant is located in a Ginza subway station. But despite its humble appearance, it is the first sushi restaurant to be awarded three Michelin stars. A three-star Michelin rating means it is worth traveling to that country to eat in that restaurant.

e-omise-8

A typical meal here costs 30,000 yen (or Php 16,000) for 20 pieces of sushi—all served within 15 minutes. But despite its top-dollar price, the restaurant is always booked—you need to reserve at least one month in advance.

Jiro dreams of sushi
Jiro dreams of sushi

Watching the film made me think of all the humble Japanese workers I’ve seen around Tokyo doing their day-to-day jobs, where even the simplest of tasks—such as gift wrapping in a department store—is performed with utmost care and skill—something us Filipinos could learn from.

Jiro Dreams of Sushi is director David Gelb’s first feature film. It teaches the importance of work and repetition, family, and the art of perfection, while chronicling Jiro’s life as an unparalleled success in the culinary world.

Jiro dreams of sushi

Jiro’s life wasn’t easy. He practically raised himself when his parents left him alone at age 7. In order to survive, he started working very young and very hard.
Though he admits having been absent during his two sons’ growing up years, he made up for lost time by training them, pushing them out the door, and making sure to leave them a legacy of hard work, pride and very high standards.
If you love sushi, Japan, and its lovely people, don’t miss this.

https://www.facebook.com/jirodreamsofsushimovie

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Lei

Thanks for recommending this film, Ms C! Though I may never be able to eat in Jiro’s restaurant, he’s story is inspiring & worth aspiring for.

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Tricia

I miss Japan! The freshness of the food. Once old sushi chef told us that only men are allowed to prepare sushi because women’s hands are too warm and will cause the food to spoil especially because the food they are preparing is raw. 

We were at one of those standing sushi places in Shibuya where the green tea was unlimited and there were hot water taps across the narrow bar. I never ate so much sushi in my life that time but how they do it there is so fresh, you’ll never feel its raw. 🙂

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arlen

hi Ms Cecile! would love to watch this..where did you Dad get the copy? thanks!

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CVS Reply:

please email me at chuvaness@me.com

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Guest

Downloaded this and just finished watching it. Thank you for sharing. Its an amazing film with loads of things to get by and learn.

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Guest

Just downloaded ths and just finished watching. Thank you for sharing. Its an amazing film, loads of things to get by.

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Rajolaurel

Thanks Cecile for this!  I will fly back to Tokyo just to eat here!  Would you mind lending me the video? Thank you so much!
R!

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CVS Reply:

yes of course!

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iarra

“It teaches the importance of work and repetition, family, and the art of
perfection, while chronicling Jiro’s life as an unparalleled success in
the culinary world.”

In a time of multi-tasking, it’s become rare and inspiring to hear about this kind of discipline.

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Valerie

I feel for the son. Everyone has very high expectations from him. I will crack from the pressure.

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Guest

sushi dai suki….oishi dayo….

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Guest

slightly unrelated, but still kind of… hehe…

just in case u didn’t know, anthony bourdain had just released his first graphic novel (aka comic book) — released on July 3rd, now a #1 NY Bestseller Times — it’s called “GET JIRO” and his lead character is based on his favorite sushi chef…

“In a not-too-distant future L.A. where master chefs rule the town like crime lords and people literally kill for a seat at the best restaurants, a bloody culinary war is raging.”

COMIC CON: http://www.g4tv.com/videos/59857/get-jiro-with-anthony-bourdain-at-comic-con-2012-live/
AMAZON: http://www.amazon.com/Get-Jiro-Anthony-Bourdain/dp/1401228275 

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Tessa Cruz

I’m glad you got to see the film na. Amazing, right?  At di talaga sya si Jiro Manio 🙂   
Interestingly, Anthony Bourdain just released Get Jiro, his first graphic novel about a sushi chef in LA with his protagonist based on Jiro Ono. 

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CVS Reply:

wow. i’ll get that

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Guest

Fantastic movie. This is one of my favourite manga series ever. The relationship Jiro has w his son is almost the same as the main characters of this book.

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CVS Reply:

My dad has that series 🙂

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Brian Hagedorn

I have been dying to watch this film ever since its mouth watering trailer! Borrow! Hehe.

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CVS Reply:

sure! 

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retortingjk

16,000 freakin pesos for 20 pieces of sushi?!

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CVS Reply:

or less. maybe 15

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js

hi! where can i get a copy of this film in manila? after this post, i also want to watch it!:)

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Guest

Too bad I’m into Sushi. I’m really not into raw fish 🙁

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CVS Reply:

whut??

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Christopher Sevilla Reply:

kabooggg hahaha peace

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Guest

kabooggg hahaha peace

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Guest

i can eat sushi all day everyday!!!! (not kidding haha)

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Jeroen

It was such a great documentary and i really want to go and eat there! As you say – 3 stars is worth traveling for 😉 

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Aina Luna Reply:

Brian (my husband whom you’ve met, Jeroen) and I watched this film over the weekend and we felt the same exact way.

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Aina Luna

Brian (my husband whom you’ve met, Jeroen) and I watched this film over the weekend and we felt the same exact way.

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Guest

Awww … inspiring!!! 🙂

Dami mong alam Ms. C! Must watch tuloy to for me. Hehehe. I ain’t really a sushi fan pero hmmm … sige, ma-try nga. :p
Tama ka rin dun … dapat matuto mga Pinoy sa kanila. Even the simplest of gift wrapping … dapat ma-awardan rin tayo! 😀

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Tara

I’m glad I didn’t read this entry with an empty stomach. Sushi it is for dinner tonight!!

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Guest

I watched this when it premiered here in Los Angeles and I’m so glad I did. It’s very moving and inspiring. I hope that I get to eat sushi from the god of sushi one day.

I admire the Japanese for having high standards with everything they do, use and create. They won’t settle for anything less than the best. I think we all should learn from them. Give our best even if it isn’t asked.

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