Talk of the town: the Birkin scammer

“A social climbing is a social climbing is a social climbing,” said one righteous commenter on my Uniqlo entry.
No offence to people who call their bags “babies,” but I’m not really impressed by people who tote expensive bags. I have a friend who sells bags that cost as much as a car, or a downpayment for a car. Some of them pay him in post-dated checks. Some of the checks bounce. Some of the people go into hiding.
As for me, I’d rather have a Porter bag I can pay for in one go. Thank God Comme des Garçons bags are not expensive.
I’ll buy the occasional leather bag (not into exotics), but canvas and nylon also work for me.

This Sunday a lot of families talked about the Birkin scammer over lunch.
I don’t know this woman. I have never heard of her until today. If she were standing in front of me, I wouldn’t know it.
But looking at her Twitter account, we are only separated by two degrees. People need to be more careful who they associate with.
Read Cheche Moral’s article in the Inquirer and find out why one shouldn’t be blinded by “riches.”

The P500-million ‘Birkin scam,’ or how a woman’s obsession led to crime
By Cheche V. Moral

Philippine Daily Inquirer

The names have been changed pending the filing of case in court.
Nate met Sheila (not their real names) in 2004 through his friend Jack, who owns an art gallery. Nate is the gallery director in a Manila university owned by his family. A former flight attendant who had taken a break from work when she married and had children, Sheila had just started working at Jack’s gallery.
Nate and Sheila quickly became friends. She was a very simple girl, he recalls in our interview, and even as she had no experience in the art scene, Sheila showed a knack for sales so that Jack began to trust her. Jack made her industrial partner, and later, managing director, widening her social network in the moneyed, art connoisseur set.
“When we first met, Nine West or Cole Haan were already expensive for her,” Nate says. “When she started hanging out with people from the art scene and several of her former flight-attendant friends who had married rich, that all began to change.”
He adds, “Louis Vuitton, she had a lot of those. Then this Birkin thing came about…”

anonymous

Nate and Sheila’s friendship developed into a business relationship. It all started smooth and harmless. Nate would travel to Europe with his partner Tom, and Sheila would ask him to buy a few designer bags to sell her “clients.”
“At times, she said the orders would be three Chanels, five Goyards, one Hermes… All of these I would finance,” Nate says. “I made money by keeping the tax refund, and for each bag, depending on the price, I would get P10,000 to P25,000 each as carrier’s fee. I did that for almost 2½ years.”
Sheila made good on her word. “I enjoyed doing it,” says Nate. “With that alone, each of my flights to Europe was already paid for. And I was also into bags. I even earned points on my credit card.”
Then he quickly adds, “Let me be clear that I was only doing it for fun. I only did it on the side, I didn’t travel to Europe just to buy bags for her.”

It was about the time Hermes opened its first boutique here that things became complicated.
Hermes Birkin was the one bag everyone lusted after. But even if you had P500,000 lying around, which was the estimated cost of the cheapest Birkin in Greenbelt, the boutique couldn’t stock up by the dozens. If you wanted one quick, you had to look elsewhere.
“She asked if I wanted to invest in the Birkins,” Nate recalls.
The deal went this way: Sheila would ask an investor to pull in P450,000. In Europe, the cheapest Birkin costs shy of P400,000. She would sell the purse for P550,000. It was a plausible proposition: Some women would rather pay the extra P50,000 (over the Manila price tag) than travel to Europe to buy a purse.
Of the total sales, P50,000 would go to the carrier who buys the bag in Europe or elsewhere, P50,000 to Sheila as middle person, and P50,000 to the investor. In short, an investor’s P450,000 becomes P500,000 in just a month, or a profit of 11 percent—a deal even the top banks couldn’t give.

This time, Nate was a mere investor, not a buyer/carrier.
“We did that for about six times,” Nate says. On the seventh time, Nate asked his nephew if he wanted to invest as well. The nephew said yes and, as usual, all parties involved laughed all the way to the bank.
“I never saw the Birkins; she just showed me photos on her phone,” Nate says. It didn’t matter. She paid him on schedule. Business was good.

Birkin

Then came February this year. Nate was readying for another Europe trip when Sheila called to ask if he had P2 million. It was for a crocodile Birkin, she said, which would cost that much. She was sure she could sell the bag the following week. Expected profit was a cool P200,000.
“In a pyramid scam, this tactic doesn’t make you instantly rich, it makes you buy time,” Tom, Nate’s partner, points out. “If I ask P2 million from you, I’ll use it to temporarily make good with everybody.”
Looking back, Nate believes the P2 million was intended to pay off checks issued investors that were due for payment. At the time, he didn’t suspect yet that anything was amiss.
Again, Nate turned to his nephew for P500,000 with a promised profit of P50,000. “My nephew wanted to invest the entire P2 million but good thing I told him no.”
Nate met with Sheila a few days later, on Feb. 13, in a friend’s house, where she handed him the check for the investment plus profit, dated Feb. 17.
“She looked different,” Nate says on hindsight. “She had no makeup on, no jewelry. She looked gaunt and sick. I didn’t know then that her financial woes were already piling up.”

On Feb. 15, a Wednesday, Sheila called Nate to say she wasn’t able to deposit the check payment of the Birkin buyer (to fund the check issued Nate). “Monday came and she called again early to say the buyer’s check bounced so she’d just deposit the amount to my account that afternoon. I kept calling the bank all day as I was leaving for Europe the next day, and nothing. I had already issued a check to my nephew dated Feb. 23. I didn’t want that to bounce, especially since I would be away. I decided to get back the check, and just paid my nephew in cash. I didn’t want any trouble with my family.”
On their way to the airport, Tom finally told Nate: “Can’t you see, the pyramid is crumbling?”

Tom says he always had misgivings about Sheila’s dealings, but he wanted to give her the benefit of the doubt. He thought it was too good to be true, but he had no reason to doubt her; she was a good friend to Nate. And up until that moment, she always delivered.
Turned out his gut feel was right. “If you can make that much money out of nothing, why would you let other people in?” Tom says rhetorically. “You’d just keep it for yourself! The fact that she can extract money from people for nothing, she must be good, all right.”

anonymous

Sheila has not been seen or heard from since February. Nate and their friends suspect she’s hiding somewhere in the US. When things unraveled, it became known that the woman had duped many people, including her own closest friends and Nate’s. The others lost enormous amounts that made the P550,000 Nate had lost seem like loose change.
“Funny because we had regular dinners and no one ever spoke of their business dealings with Sheila,” Nate says wryly. “It just seemed like good business that each wanted to keep it a secret…

“One time Sheila went to the wife-manager of an artist to ask for P5 million,” Nate says. “Her favorite line was ‘magwalis-walis ka diyan, baka naman may mahanap kang P5 million.’ When that manager told her she had no money and to ask from our friend Jane instead, Sheila replied that how could she do that when Jane was just on an allowance from her rich husband. In truth she’d already gotten P13 million from Jane!
“When it was suggested that she come to me instead, she told the person that we were not close. I’m the godfather of her son!”

Nate estimates Sheila has made off with about P500 million from different people, based on the claims of those who have come forward. “We can’t really tell how much. More victims are coming out every day.”
(Nate, Tom and Celina, another victim, spoke to Inquirer on condition of anonymity, pending the filing of a case against Sheila. Other supposed victims declined our requests for interview.)
Nate witnessed Sheila’s transformation from the simple girl he met eight years ago to a Birkin-toting social butterfly.

On her birthday last April, Sheila had a Makati salon closed for her private party. She had the model’s posters on the walls replaced with her own portraits, and she hired a top caterer. After the salon party, she and her guests were chauffeured to a five-star hotel, where she hosted dinner and after-dinner cocktails.
Nate never wondered how Sheila was able to maintain her lifestyle; he just assumed her Birkin business was doing very good.
Sheila’s husband, Jake, works for a high-profile veteran politician and wears designer suits.
“Hermes, Louis Vuitton,” Tom says. “He never wore Hugo Boss because he said it was beneath him, and that’s what he told people.” Jake’s shoe closet of over 200 pairs of designer brands—Prada, Dior, Gucci—was even featured in a shoe blog, says Nate.

celine

In an art fair last year, Sheila’s young son pointed to a random painting and said he liked it. The mom didn’t think twice about plunking P75,000 for the painting, Nate says.
Of how the couple kept their lavish lifestyle, says Tom: “I told Nate that it could be one of two things: It was either Sheila’s business was doing so good, or her husband was really corrupt.”
One time, Nate went to a Greenbelt 4 boutique with Sheila and her husband. Jake paid for the purchases in cash. When Nate asked why he didn’t use a credit card since it was a large amount, Jake joked that it was better that way since it meant no paper trail.

Sheila’s scheme turned out to be not just about Birkins. “To others, it would be paintings,” says Tom, who also owns an art gallery. “She would show a photo of a painting on her phone. She’ll say 10 Anita Magsaysay-Ho! Even a Monet! How can she get a Monet! All these people believed! Different approaches to different people. Minsan alahas, watches. Very creative.
“There are lots of sad stories. She got money from someone who was getting chemo. Someone’s house got foreclosed because they invested all their savings with Sheila. She also got money from the owner of her son’s school, even the PTA. Of course, how could they not trust her? She brought her son’s entire class to Ocean Park, complete with lunch!”

While no case has yet been filed against Sheila, the irony is that one of her former airline friends, Celina, is being sued by an investor who lost P7 million. Celina’s son had asked Jake to issue an affidavit attesting that Sheila and his mom were not “business partners,” ergo not in cahoots, as alleged in the suit, but Jake refused.
Celina was Sheila’s senior in the airline they worked for. The older woman was a sponsor at Sheila’s wedding.
“I had no reason to doubt her,” says Celina in a phone call to the Inquirer. “She had no history of being dishonest.”
Distressed about being sued for Sheila’s crime, Celina laments her predicament. “I really want to go after her, but I can’t even do that because I can’t pay for a lawyer; she made off with all my money!” She lost P11 million of her personal money to her old friend.

anonymous

A fashion designer, who asked for anonymity, describes Sheila as a good client for about five years. She never haggled, he says. At one point, she paid him with a painting; she claimed she owned a gallery.
“That was her packaging: young, rich and successful,” says the designer. “She always wore new things. Her bags were always the latest.”
Nate also found out that Sheila never sold those Chanels and Celines he had been buying for her in Europe; she used them herself. “She just never wore them when we were together. But she told our friends they were gifts from me! No wonder when someone had a birthday, they would tease me, pa-Chanel ka naman.”

The week before Sheila disappeared, Nate learned she held a garage sale, apparently to offset her other debts.
“She had 40 pairs of Tory Burch flats. If she liked something, she bought it in all colors. The Celine bags that are so popular now, she had 12 of those, all in exotic leather.”
Their friend Amy, who was closest to Sheila, wasn’t spared. She offered to sell Amy’s croc Birkin, and the trusting friend said yes. Sheila didn’t sell the bag, she only pawned it. “Good thing Amy knew the person she pawned it to. Amy redeemed her own bag,” Nate says.

celine

It wasn’t, however, the only time Sheila tried to pull a fast one on her best friend. She sold a 3-carat diamond ring to Amy, an object so cherished by the self-made IT entrepreneur that she had a safe built just for it.
But at a party, a jeweler-friend noticed that the rock was a fake. Sheila shrugged this off, saying that the stone must have been replaced by the person she entrusted with it for cleaning. She offered to reimburse Amy, just like that. The trusting friend was appeased.

Sheila’s tastes had gotten quite expensive through the years that on a Bangkok vacation last year with Nate, Tom and their girl friends, she refused to join them in the city’s bargain haunts. Instead she stayed behind in the hotel to get spa treatments, and shopped only in high-end malls.
Sheila’s Twitter account, which is public but hasn’t been updated since she disappeared, also provides an insight into her lavish lifestyle. Frequent subjects of her tweet exchanges with friends were designer clothes, bags, shoes and jewelry. (Her Facebook account has been deleted.)

Investors and creditors had cleared Sheila’s home of furniture and art pieces, says Nate, the same home she claimed she owned and had renovated for P2 million. “We were there for the blessing. It turns out they were just renting.”
Her family has since vacated the apartment, according to Nate.
“She just had to keep up with friends!” Tom says. “She must have thought they wouldn’t stay her friends if she didn’t have the same things they had.”
Even in his resentment, there’s a tinge of grief in Nate’s voice over the friendship and trust that’s now in ruins. “She was really nice,” he concedes. “We never knew she would be scamming everyone.”

Source

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002470662269 Maria Kristine Chan

     sarah evangelista

    [Reply]

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002470662269 Maria Kristine Chan

     eto twitter nya, @sje429 I have seen her bags and lavish vacations sa iban bansa, pero deleted nya na yan twitter id nya,

    [Reply]

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_LIAI3J4PISMOGFVMB4PLRZIMOI str8boy

    Did it ever occur to anyone that the ‘investors’ were also TAX EVADERS? The courier admits earning around P300k for 5 or 6 trips and it’s very likely he did not pay any income tax. The buyers are equally stupid especially if you are dealing with paintings….you don’t buy paintings from a non-entity. Paintings are not like the cheap and tacky RTW sold at Comme des Garcons or Forever 21…the provenance, ownership, and acquisition history of paintings are very important.

    [Reply]

  • literarybulimia

    Seriously?! Wholesale/Pakyawan!? :) Grabe.

    [Reply]

  • http://saicyberspace.blogspot.com Sai Sayson

    Oh my! Been hearing this for days now at ngayon ko lang nabasa ang whole story! Gee!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.facebook.com/christopher.sevilla Christopher Sevilla
  • http://chuvaness.com CVS

    so i heard…

    [Reply]

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=565956559 Jon Ray Fernandez

    There’s
    nothing wrong with nice things, as long as they are acquired honestly through
    hard work, paid for properly/promptly in full, and used in the right places and
    times (with sense-meaning, don’t use it handing out relief goods or going
    commando shopping in DV), if you can abide by all this, then you deserve a
    Birkin, Celine, Secosana or National bookstore re-usable red bag, whatever it
    is use it wisely. You cannot measure a person’s perception of their own self
    worth because of the purchases they make, some people appreciate nice things
    and they buy, we can’t blame them for doing so, some people don’t need the same
    (good for them).  No difference from you enjoying a nice cup of good Starbucks,
    paying for a THX movie ticket or taking business class.  If I buy a nice
    bag and my train of thinking is “I’m buying this because it is classic and
    it will last me my entire life and I never have to buy another freakin bag,
    pang harabas kasi matibay, pwede ko pa bigay sa anak ko.”  Then your
    sentiments and heart are sensible and in the right place. 

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    literarybulimia Reply:

    You had me at “harabas”.

    [Reply]

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    CVS Reply:

    lol

    [Reply]

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    Jon Ray Fernandez Reply:

    Hehehehe “harabas” can mean many things like-
    1. guinagamit na pang takip sa ulo pag may ulan 
    2.pwede e lagay sa sahig (Mom then says “anak naman don’t put that on the floor) 
    3.pwede gamitin weapon pag may rapist 
    4. pwede puno-in nang anik anik (sardinas, bote nang tubig, books, payong)
    5.di nalulusaw kahit e ipit sa kili kili pag puno ang train
    6.pwede pang sosyalan, party, simba, ponshon, lamay
    7.pwede gamitin pang lakbay himpapawid, dagat, lupa
    8.may pakinabang, maganda ang serbisyo
    9.hindi takot sa baha
    10. at pinaka important sa lahat, bagay sayo, carry mo!

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    literarybulimia Reply:

    Hahahahah… :)

  • MSP

    OMG!!! Her twiiter account doesn’t exist anymore! As in NOW lang as i am composing this message. Meaning, she still has access to her personal accounts. Quick, ipa NBI na yan! Trace the IP Address to know her location! CHOS! Hehe. But seriously, she sure has some guts to go online pa ha kahit “wanted” na sya. With our technology right now, she can easily be traced. For sure nabasa na nya itong blog mo Ms.C! Hehe. Updated kahit in hiding! Taray! Hehehe.

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    Ms Bautista926 Reply:

    @MSP From what you wrote it means that she definitely read everything that is why she closed her Twitter account. She did the same thinf with her FB as soon as we exposed her crime complete with her photo in February. Now she doesn’t have anywhere to go. Who are the right people to ask to trace her IP address. Most likely she is in Texas where she has a sister na sya pa yata nagbayad nung biniling bahay. Her mom though lives in Florida caregiver yata.

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  • http://twitter.com/misslongchamp Kate M

    the who ung husband? sino may link nung blog feature nya? i wanna see his shoe collection

    [Reply]

  • Barbara Dizon

    Tell me if this woman isn’t a narcissist…

    Narcissistic Personality Disorder – an individual who is excessively preoccupied with issues of personal adequacy, power, prestige and vanity.

    Symptoms of this disorder include, but are not
    limited to:

    §  Reacts
    to criticism with anger, shame, or humiliation -
    N.A.

    §  May
    take advantage of others to reach their own goals – i.e., her goal of reliving the wealthy life

    §  Tends
    to exaggerate their
    own importance, achievements, and talents – e.g., house that is not owned but rented.

    §  Imagines
    unrealistic fantasies of success, beauty, power, intelligence, or
    romance – i.e.,
    shops at high-end shops

    §  Requires
    constant attention and positive reinforcement from others – i.e., throws extravaggant parties

    §  Easily
    becomes jealous -
    N.A.

    §  Lacks empathy and
    disregards the feelings of others – i.e., she fools everyone by making them invest

    §  Obsessed
    with oneself – i.e.,
    constant need for grandiosity

    §  Mainly
    pursues selfish goals
    - i.e., only
    thinks of living the high-life

    §  Trouble
    keeping healthy relationships – i.e, where is she now???

    §  Is
    easily hurt and rejected – N.A.

    §  Sets
    unrealistic goals – i.e., fooling you into investing when you get nothing in
    return

    §  Wants
    “the best” of everything – i.e., like i said, need for grandiosity

    §  Appears
    as tough-minded or unemotional – N.A.

     

    [Reply]

  • ryq24

    hehehe! ijust did. thanks.

    [Reply]

  • http://chuvaness.com CVS

    true!! lol

    [Reply]

  • http://chuvaness.com CVS

    define “art director”?

    [Reply]

  • http://twitter.com/speyshal la pintasera

    i’m sorry, pero hindi ba kung talagang mayaman ka eh you’ll go to Europe yourself? walang agent/tagabili, walang hulugan.

    [Reply]

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    Nicko Reply:

    What? Crazy, walang yumayaman ng hindi nag ta trabaho. I am not referring to the article at hand but to what has been said. In essence she was just being practical and made it her business, yun nga lang swindling! Hahaha

    [Reply]

  • http://twitter.com/ajbrophy AJ Santos

    hay… happy na ko sa charles and keith at celine bags ko (not the popular Philo) at least from my OWN pocket! hehe

    [Reply]

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_LIAI3J4PISMOGFVMB4PLRZIMOI str8boy

    How much tax do you pay doing ‘business’ with a non-entity?? Serves you right for ‘investing’ in the blackmarket.

    [Reply]

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_LIAI3J4PISMOGFVMB4PLRZIMOI str8boy

    I don’t feel sorry for the ‘victims’. They too should be charged with TAX EVASION.

    [Reply]

  • bryologue

    Search “birkin scammer” in google.com.ph . The first result from blogspot has a screencap of her twitter account :)

    [Reply]

  • acidicboy

    fyi, the husband separated the wife early this year when the sh*t hit the fan. he also was in the dark about the ponzi scheme and only thought that she was raking it in from actually selling them bags.  the husband has his own biz with his limited run shoes and is also busy with his “day job”.  I’m sure the tsismoso and bored set won’t believe that the husband isn’t aware of this, who cares… I know the guy, his family and his upbringing. matino yan, and sadly, pati sya and his personal finances’ affected. 

    [Reply]

  • http://donasisa.tumblr.com/ Tintin

    mag longchamp na lng ako with bath and body hand sanitizer, sarap pa ng tulog ko sa gabi!

    [Reply]

  • Chipangga

    Oh I know her! I am not shocked, she has that look of a social climber. Supladita na parang kung sino. Anways, I Know some of the victims too… Sad stories… 

    [Reply]

  • Belle

    The pictures come up when you search for Birkin scammer Philippines online.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.facebook.com/kristene.hekmi Kristene Hekmi

    I’m not sure it’s just greed. This person definitely has a personality disorder of some sort. She should get psychiatric help..in jail

    [Reply]

  • http://twitter.com/HoyMaria Maria Blair

    What’s her Twitter? Share naman! :D

    [Reply]

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/WVWG7SJJT3TB7S7TNZJPS2YQRU * *

    I’ve met people who buy designer bags that are “HULUGAN” .  I never understood that.  If you can’t afford to pay it upfront, that means you can’t afford it, period!

    But then, there are also people who judge you by the material things attached to your body, the car you drive or the kind of house u have.  SAD.

    [Reply]

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    Bre Reply:

    That’s Suze Orman’s point! If you can’t afford it, don’t buy it! I  prefer to pay upfront, too. If  I use my credit card, I pay it ASAP. Thanks God I was taught early on about finances, debts, and bankruptcy.  I  understand though why one does staggered payments for an expensive  item which he/she wants/needs, as long as he/she has the means to pay and pays it on time. That’s how economy works.  People will always have opinions about anything and everything. But if one knows his/her moral values,  financial status,  priorities, and is realistic about his/ her responsibilities and accountability, the opinions of others  on what he/she has or doesn’t have won’t be a factor on how he/she lives.

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    Supernova Reply:

    Well, it’s good if you can fully pay for something like a car upfront, but for other people like me, there’s little choice but to avail of other options. I bought my car on installment after scrutinizing the payment
    scheme and everything worked out beautifully. I was able to purchase
    something I needed and truly wanted. I did not financially jeopardize
    myself doing it and I didn’t scam anyone. It was a good decision, however way I looked at it, kaya I don’t see anything wrong with hulugan and the likes. Same with the expensive birkins. I don’t wanna judge women who want to own a birkin (kasi I don’t wanna be judged for my tastes either; I could’ve gotten a cheap basic car but opted for the one I really liked na medyo mahal, so to each his own na lang ang masasabi ko, LOL), but as long as they’re able to fulfill the terms of whatever payment scheme they got themselves into to get one, hindi naman ninakaw yung pambayad, hindi kinuha sa college fund ng anak, etc., then why not.

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    omnesia Reply:

     Hindi masama ang utang. money makes the world go round! Ang masama eh hindi nagbabayad ng utang!!

    avatar

    neysuh Reply:

     Ibang iba naman ang kotse sa bag. Bag lang yun. So understandable ang pagbabayad ng installment sa kotse.

    avatar

    CVS Reply:

    exactly

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=786944856 Gladys Santos

    ive been searching for the twitter acct, d ko talaga makita…im so curious kung cnu, can u pm me the twitter name.

    [Reply]

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    CVS Reply:

    she deleted her Twitter account today @sje429:twitter 

    [Reply]

  • http://chuvaness.com CVS

    whatever happened to that Citibank scammer?

    [Reply]

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    acidicboy Reply:

    hard to believe, but my sources have told me citibank’s top management (abroad) has (or had) acquired the services of israeli commandos.  

    [Reply]

  • brooklynstoops

     hi cvs, i follow your blog to keep up with the goings on in manila as i haven’t been there in ages.  one thing has remained constant-it’s still a little town infested with a lot of wannabes… totally flashy and cringe worthy. that’s my 2 cents.

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    omnesia Reply:

    nyek heto na naman tayo with a comment to generalize Manila and Filipinos. Have you even ever heard or read about Bernie Madoff? Greed, crime and corruption happens everywhere in the universe. Just saying it’s so pointless to shift the topic to this angle.

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    str8boy Reply:

     is it only manila??? what about new york and london and milan? it’s full of old men and tropy wives and infested with famous only for being trashy reality tv stars. you haven’t been in manila in ages…you probably haven’t been in many other places…in short, mura lang pamasahe mag-jet set ngayon. don’t generalize.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=658622931 Gladdys Corpuz

    Seriously! Is her lavish lifestyle more important than having good and loyal friends beside her? Does she even realize that her whole family will be affected once everything come crumbling down?
    I can never understand social climbing people. High-end things can make you temporarily happy, whereas friends and family will always be there for you.

    IMO, its okay if you have nice things as long as you can afford them and you’re not hurting anyone through the process. It’s really sad how such things can completely overtake someone.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1011120552 Arra Bernardo

    what is her twitter name? please

    [Reply]

  • literarybulimia

    It’s sad, especially since she has a kid. I do like her Ivar dresses though.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=832952935 Christine Marie Fernandez

    the moneyed ones like ms c, are the ones who are down to earth. the ones who always have a need to keep up with the rich are the ones who are obsessed with owning the birkins. ano sya si jinkee p? kung ganun sya ka yaman (?) eh di ok. tsk tsk tsk GREED and ENVY plain and simple!

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    iarra Reply:

    the grounded moneyed ones, being used to privilege, see no need to flaunt or establish it. those who aren’t feel they need to prove it pa.

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    guest Reply:

    The ultra-wealthy individuals wear top quality stuff, even those grounded ones, but they don’t intentionally flaunt it. It’s the public that makes a big deal out of it. But I don’t see any wrong on anyone wanting to wear top branded items, just as long as they don’t go into debt or starve their family just to acquire certain items. Life is short and i think people should treat themselves to something of their liking even once in their lifetime.

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    iarra Reply:

    I didn’t say there’s anything wrong about wearing top branded items. My point really has to do more about FLAUNTING not being classy.

    Anyway I was just pointing out a reality. Minsan naman talaga kung hindi ka sanay mas excited ka eh. Peace.

  • trader003

    @SJE429:twitter 

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  • http://chenmeicai.blogspot.com Chai Chen

    Now na nasulat na ang mga ito, I can’t help but google search “Birkin Scammer” and the likes. Her name and pictures appear. Tsk tsk. So sad yet scary how big this has become. Poor kid. :( The parents are doing this? For the sake of what? Lifestyle? Social climbing? Tsk. 

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  • AGil

    I don’t care how much they cost, what they’re made of or how well they’re crafted — at the end of the day, it’s really just a bag. There’s a difference between admiring quality and thinking an inanimate object will actually make your life better. If you don’t think you’re good enough without it, then you’ll never be good enough, regardless of how many signature bags you have.

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    Pedro Reply:

    taenang mga yan, bag lang milyunan na.. tiis nga kami sa plastic na lang ng sm ang ginagamit na bag pag naluwas..

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  • Haley

    Im saddened how the mind gets over powered with money! They’ll do everything just to taste that social ladder. Even selling their souls to rich or powerful men. Maybe a few wealthy men as well! That is the cancer of today.

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  • omnesia

    Sabi ko na kilala ko yung gallery director/uni owner. Unbelievable how he and his friends would run into this kind of person…

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  • http://www.pinkmagaline.com/ Mrs. Kolca

    Haha. This is why I don’t really mind those women toting expensive bags like LV or Chanel kuno. I mean sometimes, it is easy to tell naman if someone is really rich or social climbing di ba? And like you Miss C, I’d rather buy a local leather bag (good quality naman) kesa kumuha ng hulugan na LV! :D

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  • Maria

    Because she hasn’t been tried in court yet.

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  • http://twitter.com/divasoria divasoria

    “She would show a photo of a painting on her phone. She’ll say 10 Anita Magsaysay-Ho! Even a Monet! How can she get a Monet! All these people believed! Different approaches to different people. Minsan alahas, watches. Very creative.”

    can’t believe people can be so gullible enough to trust somebody who promised them a MONET?!?!? HELLO. ano siya? d’orsay? SUS!  

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    CVS Reply:

    lol

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    Kristene Hekmi Reply:

    Best comment ever

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    Jude Lopez Mancuyas Reply:

    Baka naman MONET as in Jewelry. HAHAHAHAHA

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    CVS Reply:

    megaknown?

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    Jude Lopez Mancuyas Reply:

    Here. LOL

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    omnesia Reply:

    Yes meron nyan sa Rustan’s. hehe

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    Jude Lopez Mancuyas Reply:

    Tawag ni mommy sa MONET- “Fancy”. hahahaha. 

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    omnesia Reply:

     hahaha we love our moms

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    Ojay Fudalan Jr. Reply:

    I think the circle she belongs to is also full of the same personalities: social climbers. A true mark of a social climber is his/her gullibility to believe shit is gold as long as they’re told it is.

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    auto Reply:

    ayon sa nakalap kong balita, ang litrato daw sa phone ni sarah evangelista ay hindi ng isang monet (the painter) kundi ng isang monet lolit. isang sikat na talkshow host.

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  • http://eltorobumingo.blogspot.com el toro bumingo

    Bags, bags and more bags! Buti na lang I’m not into bags :)

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    CVS Reply:

    how bout eyebags? :)

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  • http://www.topazhorizon.com Topaz Horizon

    Naaawa ako sa mga anak niya =(

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  • Carmen Watkins11

    that’s so terrible..scamming your own..”supposed” friends:(…
    i can just imagine the lives of families affected because of this woman’s selfish desires to live the luxe life–
    one that she can’t even really afford!!!

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  • Buchi

    Ang sabi nga sa Bibliya… “What does it profit a man to gain the whole world, yet lose his own soul”

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  • sandy

    lesson learned don’t be blinded by harmes, lv etc… unless na nanalo sa lotto then buy whatever u want kung katulad lang kita na maliit ang sweldo then buy something na magandang bag pero nd expensive like secosana or avon 

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  • omnesia

    Sabi nga ng nanay ni Bambi Arambulo sa Temptation Island… katakut-takot na keeping up with the Joneses!!!!!

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  • puppyeyes

    I saw her twitter too and she only posts about luxurious clothes or accessories or inviting her friends to expensive places. Are these things really worth all the trouble of losing her friends and being stressed about her non-ending monetary concerns? Parang mas maganda pa mag secosana kung ganyan lang din

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    kaloka Reply:

    what’s her twitter name?

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    puppyeyes Reply:

    SJE429 :) Ok lang ba lagay ko dito? haha

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    Jake de Asis Reply:

    Pa-PM naman ng twitter name pls, sobra akong intrigued lol thanks :)

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    Gladys Santos Reply:

    please i wanna know too!paki pm naman ng name! salamat…

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    genen Reply:

    Just google birkin scammer… easy to find out initials S.E.

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    Gladys Santos Reply:

    thanks! there was a blog about her but it was deleted,oh well! pano kaya sya nakakatulog sa gabi?para lng sa mga bags! sheesshhh…

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    kaloka Reply:

    thanks!

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    Jake de Asis Reply:

    never mind, knows ko na, thanks :)

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  • http://twitter.com/annalyn annalyn

    oops, nasa name pala ng photo. honestly, haven’t heard of her

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  • http://twitter.com/annalyn annalyn

    omg…sino yan? clues pls

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